The collection of addons I use is growing, and some of them are quite amazing so I thought once a week I’d take an in-depth look at one that I use, explaining how it works and what it’s used for. AddOns are not essential to any game, but they do help quality of life a huge amount, and I think there are so many options available out there it’s nice to get a cohesive list.

The first addon I’m going to talk about is one called altoholic. If you’re not familiar with how to install addons in World of Warcraft, well there’s really no excuse these days it’s pretty hands off. You simple download the twitch desktop client (previously known as the curse client) swap the screen over to mods (top left side), find WoW (make sure it’s pointing at the correct directory) and you’ll see two columns. One is ‘my addons’ and the other is ‘get more addons’. Pretty simple stuff. Then you just do a search.

Anyway. Altoholic keeps track of pretty much everything for all of your characters, and it’s lovely. It will keep track of order hall resources (and pretty much any currency you want), how many order hall followers you have, what ilevel they’re sitting at, what your artifact weapons are at as far as levels, what professions each character has and what level they’re at, bag space, and even what inventory they each have. I’ve been using this addon to monitor old WoD garrison resources so I can trade them in for craft materials to continue to level up a few characters that are below 700 in their respective craft.

It will tell you if missions are completed, how long it has been since you logged them in, how many auctions they currently have on the go, how much mail they have, how many AH bids they have, and even things like achievements.

It’s basically a one stop shop to see everything about everyone you play, and if you happen to be a collector of alts (like some of us are) it’s an addon that I really can’t recommend enough.

What I like most of all about this addon is that besides logging your characters in there’s almost no customization required. The default display is everything I need though you can customize some features and even enable account sharing if you happen to be multiboxing.

The addon is also pretty small as far as memory usage, clocking in at around 3.8mb for me personally. So far I haven’t come across a downside, but if you spot one please do share!

Next week we’ll be taking a look at GSE: Gnome Sequencer Enhanced, an advanced macro addon.